Building your best day for cardiovascular health

Years funded:
2019 - 2022

THE PROBLEM: The way people use their time (e.g., sleep, physical activity, sitting, social interactions) impacts on their cardiovascular health. The relationships between patterns of daily time use and cardiovascular disease are poorly understood, meaning activity interventions lack underpinning evidence, and many are destined to lack impact before commencing.

OVERALL AIMS: This project aims to determine the optimal daily activity balance, the “best day” for overall cardiovascular health. The 2-year program of research will use both adult and child datasets which contain comprehensive measures of cardiovascular health and risk. New statistical methods will be used to simulate the cardiovascular gain that could realistically be achieved if activity behaviours were targeted in combination. The findings will be translated to potential intervention strategies. The inevitable trade-offs that occur throughout the day will be accounted for (e.g., more physical activity may be at the expense of sleep).

EXPECTED OUTCOMES:  Findings will inform experimental studies to improve 24-hour time use, rather than focussing on individual activities in isolation. Various time-reallocations may have similar cardiovascular benefit, meaning individuals can choose how to optimise their time use, potentially improving uptake and adherence to positive behaviour change. Findings will also inform prioritisation of population groups and behaviours, so as to optimise return on resources invested. 

Researcher Profile

Dr Dorothea Dumuid

Institute: University of South Australia
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