Heart attacks more likely on Mondays

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More people are diagnosed with serious heart conditions, including heart attacks on Mondays than any other day of the week according to new research released today by the National Heart Foundation of Australia.

More people are diagnosed with serious heart conditions, including heart attacks on Mondays than any other day of the week according to new research released today by the National Heart Foundation of Australia.

The research involved more than 45,000 heart patients treated at 11 public hospital emergency departments between 2008 and 2012, and showed the number of people presenting with heart conditions on a Monday was at least 27% higher compared to either Saturday or Sunday.

Patients on a Monday were also more likely to make their own way to hospital rather than call an ambulance and more likely to show up during work hours from 9am to 5pm.

In addition, data from one South Australian hospital revealed one in four people who presented on a Monday had waited at least 24 hours after their first symptom before seeking treatment.

The Heart Foundation's Health Director, Rachelle Foreman said the data suggests people are ignoring the warning signs and delaying treatment until the weekend is over.

“Early diagnosis and treatment of any heart problem, especially a heart attack is vital for your chances of survival. No matter what day of the week, understanding and recognising the warning signs is the key to getting help fast,” Ms Foreman said.

“People who are treated within an hour of their first symptom have the greatest chance of not only surviving their heart attack, but continuing to enjoy a good quality of life.

“With Heart Week approaching, the Heart Foundation is urging all Australians to learn the warning signs of a heart attack – they’re not always sudden or severe.”

Symptoms may include pain, pressure, heaviness or tightness in the upper body (chest, neck, jaw, arm(s), shoulder(s) or back) in combination with nausea, shortness of breath, dizziness or a cold sweat.

If you think you could be having a heart attack, call Triple Zero (000) immediately, because every minute counts. For more information, visit heartattackfacts.org.au or call our Health Information Service on 1300 36 27 87. 
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Media Contact: 

Dominique Lemon National Media Adviser (03) 9321 1533 Mob: 0411 310 997